Children

Rethinking English Learner Data: Illinois' Plans Under the Every Student Succeeds Act

Report Author: 
Janie Tankard Carnock
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jan

This report provides an analysis of Illinois' innovative approach to producing and analyzing data on English language learners (ELLs). The federal Office of Education approved Illinois' plan under the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), including its approach to managing data, in August of 2017. Unlike other states, which combine current and former ELLs into one group, Illinois will keep the two groups separate and distinct and collect data on "former ELs" through grade 12.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Other

New Opportunities? ESSA and Its Implications for Dual Language Learners and ECEC Workforce Development

Report Author: 
Delia Pompa, Maki Park and Michael Fix
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Dec

The passage of the Every Student Succeeds Act in 2015, the successor legislation to the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, provides new opportunities to integrate early childhood education and care (ECEC) with K-12 education. This has special importance for dual language learners who now represent 32 percent of all children under the age of 5.  This report details all of the mechanisms available under the Act to strengthen ECEC for immigrant children.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Living in an Immigrant Family in America: How Fear and Toxic Stress are affecting Daily Life, Well-Being, & Health

Report Author: 
Samantha Artiga & Petry Ubri
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Dec

According to this report, immigrant families from various backgrounds are living with increased fear and uncertainty due to the current political climate. The election of Donald Trump has led to policies that increase immigration enforcement and restrict the entry of immigrants from selected countries. These policies can potentially impact 23 million non-citizens who live in the United States, as well as 12 million children who are predominantly U.S.-born.

Source Organization: 
Other

When More Means Less: Mapping the Gaps between Expert and Public Understandings of Dual Language Learners

Report Author: 
Marissa Fond, Michelle Smirnova, Marisa Gerstein Pineau, and Julie Sweetland
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Dec

In an effort to develop "powerful strategies to change how people think about and understand language development," a group of three foundations (the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Heising-Simons Foundation, and the McKnight Foundation) commissioned the FrameWorks Institute to identify the key concepts to be communicated to the public, the nature of the resistance to those concepts, and strategies for overcoming that resistance.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Other

Differing DREAMs: Estimating the Unauthorized Populations that Could Benefit under Different Legalization Bills, Migration Policy Institute

Report Author: 
Jeanne Batalova, Ariel G. Ruiz Soto, Sarah Pierce, and Randy Capps
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Oct

In 2017, the Trump administration announced that it would terminate the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. The DACA program had granted protection from deportation and work authorization to unauthorized immigrants who arrived in the United States as children, also known as DREAMers. By mid-October 2017, multiple bills were introduced in response to this announcement including the Recognizing America's Children Act (RAC Act), the DREAM Act of 2017, the American Hope Act, the SUCCEED Act, and Border Security and Deferred Action Recipient Relief Act.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Dual Language Learners: A National Demographic and Policy Profile

Report Author: 
Maki Park, Anna O’Toole, and Caitlin Katsiaficas
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Oct

Defined as children ages 8 and under with at least one parent who speaks a language other than English at home, dual language learners (DLLs) now make up nearly one-third of all young children in the United States. This report provides a demographic overview of the DLL population and identifies policies and practices that have proven effective in educating these children. The authors point out the vulnerabilities of these children, e.g.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Comparing trauma exposure, mental health needs, and service utilization across clinical samples of refugee, immigrant, and US-Origin children

Report Author: 
Betancourt, T. S., Newnham, E. A., Birman, D., Lee, R., Ellis, B. H., & Layne, C. M
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

Although the experiences of immigrant children differ from refugee youth, both groups experience stressors associated with acculturation, resettlement, and potential abuse or community violence. Mental health care is underutilized among refugee youth given that most services do not take into account distinct traumatic experiences and histories resulting from war-related violence.

Source Organization: 
Other

Unaccompanied migrant children in the United States: Predictors of placement stability in long term foster care

Report Author: 
Crea, T. M., Lopez, A., Taylor, T., Underwood, D.
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 May

Beginning in 2011, there was an increase of unaccompanied children from the Central American Northern Triangle (El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras,) entering the U.S. While many children were placed with adult sponsors, about 5%-35% remain in long term foster care (LTFC) waiting for deportation hearings. Research has shown that instability in the foster system such as moving frequently has led to poor outcomes.

Source Organization: 
Other

Addressing health disparities in the mental health of refugee children and adolescents through community-based participatory research: A study in 2 communities

Report Author: 
Bentancourt, T.S., Frounfelker, R., Mishra, T., Hussein, A., & Falzarano, R.
Original Date of Publication: 
2015 Jul

Refugee youth have a much higher risk of experiencing psychological distress and mental health disorders than their non-refugee U.S. peers. Much of this elevated risk is due to "multiple acute and chronic stressors" that youth face throughout their refugee experience. To explore the mental health needs and community strengths of Somali Bantu and Bhutanese refugee youth in Massachusetts, this study utilized a community-based participatory research approach - a method that ensures the communities being studied are meaningfully involved at all research stages.

Source Organization: 
Other

Missing Out: Refugee Education in Crisis

Report Author: 
The UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR)
Original Date of Publication: 
2016 Sep

This report tells the stories of some of the world's six million refugee children and adolescents under UNHCR's mandate who are of primary and secondary school-going age between 5 and 17. In addition, it looks at the educational aspirations of refugee youth eager to continue learning after secondary education. Education data on refugee enrolments and population numbers is drawn from UNHCR's population data base, reporting tools and education surveys. The data refers to the 2015-16 school year.

Source Organization: 
Other
Syndicate content