European immigrants

The U.S. Undocumented Population Fell Sharply During the Obama Era: Estimates for 2016

Report Author: 
Robert Warren
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Feb

The undocumented immigrant population in the United States fell by nearly 1 million persons between the years 2010 and 2016 -- from 11.7 million to 10.8 million. The number of undocumented is at its lowest level since 2003.The largest undocumented group, persons from Mexico, has declined sharply. Undocumented Mexicans numbered 6.6 million in 2010 but fell to 5.7 million in 2016. Populations from South America (Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru) and Europe (Poland) also fell between 2010 and 2016.

Source Organization: 
Other

Becoming White: How Mass Warfare Turned Immigrants into Americans

Report Author: 
Soumyajit Mazumdar
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Dec

The major thesis of this paper is that the state can play a central role in helping immigrants forge a national identity. The mobilization of millions of men to fight during World War I, many of whom were immigrants, following so soon after a great period of migration, provides an excellent test case. Based on data gathered from the 1930 U.S. Census, Mazumdar investigates the relationship between war service and cultural assimilation.

Source Organization: 
Other

U.S. Resettles Fewer Refugees, Even as Global Number of Displaced People Grows

Report Author: 
Phillip Connor
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Oct

This report presents a detailed demographic analysis of the incoming U.S. refugee population from FY 2002 to FY 2017 and includes the following data points:  nationality, religious affiliation, gender, age, and state of resettlement.

Source Organization: 
Other

How are Refugees Faring: Integration at U.S. and State Levels

Report Author: 
Michael Fix, Kate Hoper, and Jie Zong
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

This study looks at the educational and economic outcomes of five refugee communities (Vietnamese, Cuban, Russian, Iraqi and Burmese) in four states (California, Florida, New York and Texas).  The key question is whether the location of refugee resettlement has a significant impact on refugee integration.  This has been described as “the lottery effect” – the idea that refugees’ lives are impacted by being placed in locales with very different labor markets, costs of living and social safety nets.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Immigrant Health-Care Workers in the United States

Report Author: 
Szilvia Altorjai and Jeanne Batalova
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

With health-care reform high on the legislative agenda and the implications of immigration policy changes on particular populations in the news, the role of the foreign born in medical occupations has become a topic of intense interest. Immigrants represent a significant slice of this labor force, comprising almost 17 percent of the 12.4 million people in the United States working as doctors, nurses, dentists, and in other health-care occupations in 2015.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Language Diversity and English Proficiency in the United States

Report Author: 
Jeanne Batalova and Jie Zong
Original Date of Publication: 
2016 Nov

A new study reveals that 25.9 million individuals in the United States were Limited English Proficient (LEP) in 2015, including roughly half of the foreign-born population of 43.3 million. In “Language Diversity and English Proficiency in the United States,” the Migration Policy Institute presents a profile of LEP individuals ages five and older using Census data from 1980-2015.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Building an Organizational Response to Health Disparities: A Practical Guide to Implementing the National CLAS Standards

Report Author: 
National Committee for Quality Assurance
Original Date of Publication: 
2016 Nov

Building an Organizational Response to Health Disparities: A Practical Guide to Implementing the National CLAS Standards

In 2013, the federal Office of Minority Health (OMH) issued the "enhanced" National CLAS Standards  (Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services) to guide health and health care organizations in their efforts to ensure health equity.

Source Organization: 
Other
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