Latin American immigrants

Stereotyped identification: How identifying with fictional Latina characters increases acceptance and stereotyping

Report Author: 
Bryan McLaughlin, Nathian S. Rodriguez, Joshua A. Dunn & Jobi Martinez
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Apr

Film and media are powerful tools of influence. Although the messages can positively influence greater acceptance of certain groups, they can also intentionally or unintentionally create and uphold stereotypes of immigrants. A study by Mclaughlin, Rodriguez, Dunn, & Martinez (2018) demonstrates how television portrayals of Latina women allow viewers to cognitively and emotionally identify with the characters. This resonating identification in media increases viewers' empathy towards and acceptance of actual Latina women and immigrants on a large scale.

Source Organization: 
Other

Dominican Immigrants in the United States

Report Author: 
Jie Zong & Jeanne Batalova
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Apr

This "Spotlight" report details the major demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of Dominican immigrants in the U.S. based on census and Department of Homeland Security data. Among data points covered in the report are: educational attainment, labor force participation, income and poverty levels, immigration pathways and naturalization rates, health coverage, and remittance levels.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Dating out is intercultural: Experience and perceived parent disapproval by ethnicity and immigrant generation

Report Author: 
Sharon Shenhav, Belinda Campos and Wendy A. Goldberg
Original Date of Publication: 
2016 Apr

While differences of opinion regarding dating often leads to conflict between parents and children, romantic relationships between individuals from different cultural groups (intercultural relationships) may be particularly fraught. Older generations are typically less approving of intercultural relationships than younger individuals. These intergenerational conflicts may be exacerbated in immigrant families, as intergroup relationships may be viewed as a threat to maintaining cultural traditions and ethnic identity.

Source Organization: 
Other

Socioeconomic Integration of U.S. Immigrant Groups over the Long Term: The Second Generation and Beyond

Report Author: 
Brian Duncan & Stephen J. Trejo
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Mar

Large-scale immigration raises questions about the social and economic progress of new arrivals, their U.S.-born children and the third generation. Some observers suggest that the sheer size and geographic concentration of recent immigration could hinder immigrants' social and economic integration. The authors of this paper examine some of the available data on this question, as well as methodological problems associated with the data. The Current Population Survey (CPS) has nativity questions about the respondent and her/his parents that may be used to assess generational change.

Source Organization: 
Other

Connecting the Dots: Emerging Migration Trends and Policy Questions in North and Central America

Report Author: 
Claudia Masferrer, Víctor M. García-Guerrero, and Silvia E. Giorguli-Saucedo
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Mar

The authors of this paper take a sweeping look at the entire North American "migration corridor," consisting of Canada, the United States, Mexico, and the "Northern Triangle" countries of El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras. They note that patterns of migration are much more complex and multi-directional than they were in the past, when south-north migration was the dominant pattern. For example, approximately 1 million U.S.-born persons moved to Mexico during the 2010-2015 period, made up largely of retirees and children of persons deported from the U.S.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Hispanic Identity Fades Across Generations as Immigrant Connections Fall Away

Report Author: 
Mark Hugo Lopez, et al
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Dec

While there are 42.7 million adults in the United States with Hispanic ancestry, 11 percent do not identify as Hispanic. This number is expected to increase due to a long-standing high intermarriage rate and a decade of decreasing immigration from Latin America. In the report Hispanic Identity Fades Across Generations as Immigrant Connections Fall, the authors examine the experiences and self-identity of U.S. adults with Hispanic heritage.

Source Organization: 
Other

The U.S. Undocumented Population Fell Sharply During the Obama Era: Estimates for 2016

Report Author: 
Robert Warren
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Feb

The undocumented immigrant population in the United States fell by nearly 1 million persons between the years 2010 and 2016 -- from 11.7 million to 10.8 million. The number of undocumented is at its lowest level since 2003.The largest undocumented group, persons from Mexico, has declined sharply. Undocumented Mexicans numbered 6.6 million in 2010 but fell to 5.7 million in 2016. Populations from South America (Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru) and Europe (Poland) also fell between 2010 and 2016.

Source Organization: 
Other

Effective strategies for Affordable Care Act enrollment in immigrant-serving safety net clinics in New Mexico

Report Author: 
Getrich, C., García, J., Solares, A., & Kano, M.
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 May

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) has been widely viewed as a mechanism for reducing health disparities through expanding insurance coverage and thus healthcare access. However, the ACA distinguishes between lawfully present and unauthorized immigrants, with the latter being excluded from the ACA's insurance enrollment options. This study interviewed healthcare providers at safety net clinics (including community health centers) in New Mexico, one of the country's poorest states whose population is also 47.7% Hispanic (many of whom are immigrants).

Source Organization: 
Other

The healthcare needs of Latinos with serious mental illness and the potential of peer navigators

Report Author: 
Corrigan, P., Torres, W., Lara, A., Sheehan, J., & Larson, L
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jul

The healthcare needs of Latinxs with severe mental illness, barriers to accessing care, potential solutions to those barriers and the possibility that peer navigators might be able to fill the gap were addressed by this study. Through a community-based participatory research (CBPR) model in which Latinxs with a lived experience of severe mental illness were involved at all stages of the process, focus groups and interviews were conducted with members of several Latinx communities in Chicago.

Source Organization: 
Other

Immigration policies and mental health morbidity among Latinos: A state-level analysis

Report Author: 
Hatzenbuehler, M.L., Prins, S.J., Flake, M., Philbin, M., Frazer, M.S., Hagen, D., & Hirsch, J.
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Feb

Social workers understand the importance of analyzing their client in the context of their environment. Macro structures (e.g. policy) have a direct impact on the mental health disparities and vulnerabilities of Latino populations. According to research by Hatzenbuehler et al. (2017), Latinos living in environments with exclusionary immigration policies and climates have significantly higher rates of poor mental health days than Latinos in less exclusionary environments.

Source Organization: 
Other
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