Latin American immigrants

A Statistical and Demographic Profile of the US Temporary Protected Status Populations from El Salvador, Honduras, and Haiti

Report Author: 
Robert Warren and Donald Kerwin
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jul

About 90 percent of Temporary Protected Status recipients are from El Salvador, Honduras and Haiti. At the time that “A Statistical and Demographic Profile of the US Temporary Protected Status Populations from El Salvador, Honduras, and Haiti” was published, TPS for these three countries were up for renewal (but have been since been terminated.) This paper examines the demographics of TPS beneficiaries from El Salvador, Honduras and Haiti and evaluates what would happen to the U.S. and TPS holders if TPS designations ended.

Source Organization: 
Other

Economic Contributions by Salvadoran, Honduran, and Haitian TPS Holders: The Cost to Taxpayers, GDP, and Businesses of Ending TPS

Report Author: 
Amanda Baran and Jose Magaña-Salgado with Tom K. Wong
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Apr

Due to extraordingary, temporary, natural disasters in El Salvador, Honduras, and Haiti, the United States Congress granted Temporary Protected Status to individuals from those countries currently in the U.S. because returning to their home country would be unsafe. TPS grants individuals work authorization and protection from deportation until the Secretary determines that those immigrants' home countries can safely handle the return of their nationals.

Source Organization: 
Other

Extending Temporary Protected Status for Honduras: Country Conditions and U.S. Legal Requirements

Report Author: 
Jayesh Rathod et al
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Nov

Following Hurricane Mitch in 1998, which displaced thousands of people and severely damaged physical infrastructure and socio-economic stability in Honduras and Nicaragua, the U.S. Congress granted Temporary Protected Status (TPS) to Hondurans and Nicaraguans in the U.S. TPS provides relief to foreign nationals who are unable to return to their home countries due to natural disaster, economic instability or violence. This report details the current conditions in Honduras.

Source Organization: 
Other

Can the Government Deport Immigrants Using Information it Encouraged Them to Provide?

Report Author: 
Amanda Frost
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Sep

This essay describes the legal and policy issues raised by any systematic effort to deport unauthorized immigrants based on information the government invited them to provide. Part I of the essay briefly surveys some of the major laws, regulations, and programs that encourage unauthorized immigrants to identify themselves. Part II assesses the statutory and constitutional arguments that immigrants could raise as a defense against deportations based on self-reported data.

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Source Organization: 
Other

Differing DREAMs: Estimating the Unauthorized Populations that Could Benefit under Different Legalization Bills, Migration Policy Institute

Report Author: 
Jeanne Batalova, Ariel G. Ruiz Soto, Sarah Pierce, and Randy Capps
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Oct

In 2017, the Trump administration announced that it would terminate the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. The DACA program had granted protection from deportation and work authorization to unauthorized immigrants who arrived in the United States as children, also known as DREAMers. By mid-October 2017, multiple bills were introduced in response to this announcement including the Recognizing America's Children Act (RAC Act), the DREAM Act of 2017, the American Hope Act, the SUCCEED Act, and Border Security and Deferred Action Recipient Relief Act.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

U.S. Resettles Fewer Refugees, Even as Global Number of Displaced People Grows

Report Author: 
Phillip Connor
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Oct

This report presents a detailed demographic analysis of the incoming U.S. refugee population from FY 2002 to FY 2017 and includes the following data points:  nationality, religious affiliation, gender, age, and state of resettlement.

Source Organization: 
Other

Profiles of Boston’s Latinos

Report Author: 
Boston Planning & Development Agency
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

Although the various Latino nationality groups in Boston are often described as a single ethnic group, there is great diversity within the Latino community. Profiles of Boston’s Latinos by the Boston Planning & Development Agency captures this diversity by examining the seven largest Latino groups in Boston: Puerto Rican (28 percent of total Latino population), Dominican (24 percent), Salvadoran (11 percent), Colombian (6 percent), Mexican (5 percent), Brazilian (3 percent), and Guatemalan (3 percent). Using data from the U.S.

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Source Organization: 
Other

Local Immigration Enforcement and Arrests of the Hispanic Population

Report Author: 
Michael Coon
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 May

The enforcement of immigration in the United States has traditionally fallen under the jurisdiction of the federal government. Over time, however, state and local law enforcement have taken a larger role in immigration enforcement, largely at the urging of the federal government. Federal programs such as the Criminal Alien Program (CAP), the Secure Communities program and the 287(g) program are all designed to help local agencies identify members of immigrant communities for detention and deportation.

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Source Organization: 
Other

Coming of Age on the Margins: Mental Health and Wellbeing Among Latino Immigrant Young Adults Eligible for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA)

Report Author: 
Rachel Siemons, Marissa Raymond-Flesh, Colette L. Auerswald, Claire D. Brindis
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

Undocumented immigrant Latino young adults face discrimination, marginalization, and are restricted from accessing critical resources such as health insurance through the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Moreover, the fear and stressors associated with the possibility of being deported can affect the mental health and wellbeing (MHWB) of undocumented immigrants. This study aims to assess the effects of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) on the MHWB of 61 Latino young adults using the ecological framework.

Source Organization: 
Other

Racism, the immigration enforcement regime, and the implications for racial inequality in the lives of undocumented young adults

Report Author: 
Aranda, E., & Vaquera, E.
Original Date of Publication: 
2015 Jan

Despite the fact that living without legal documentation in the U.S. is considered a civil offense, undocumented immigrants are often depicted and treated as criminals. As a result, undocumented immigrants are subjected to policing and disciplining, such as detainment and use of ankle monitoring device, that are reserved for people who commit serious criminal offenses. Moreover, during President Barrack Obama's presidency, mass deportation reached an all-time high that only sustained the fears and anxiety of undocumented immigrants.

Source Organization: 
Other
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