Latin American immigrants

Unaccompanied migrant children in the United States: Predictors of placement stability in long term foster care

Report Author: 
Crea, T. M., Lopez, A., Taylor, T., Underwood, D.
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 May

Beginning in 2011, there was an increase of unaccompanied children from the Central American Northern Triangle (El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras,) entering the U.S. While many children were placed with adult sponsors, about 5%-35% remain in long term foster care (LTFC) waiting for deportation hearings. Research has shown that instability in the foster system such as moving frequently has led to poor outcomes.

Source Organization: 
Other

The Education and Work Profiles of the DACA Population

Report Author: 
Randy Capps, Michael Fix, and Jie Zong
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Aug

The authors of this report applied their unique methodology to Census data to determine the characteristics of what they call the DACA “immediately eligible” population—those who have met all educational requirements for participation in the program. Past studies of this population have been survey-based, but have not been fully representative.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Deportations in the Dark: Lack of Process and Information in the Removal of Mexican Migrants

Report Author: 
Sara Campos & Guillermo Cantor
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Sep

This report is based on the testimonies of 600 migrants who were deported from the United States to Mexico between August 2016 and April 2017. Those interviewed pointed towards systematic failures to follow established procedures for detention and deportation. For example, 43.5 percent of interviewees reported that they were not informed of their right to contact their consulate, and more than half (55.7 percent) were not asked if they feared returning home – a key element of applying for asylum.

Source Organization: 
Other

Immigration and the Bully Pulpit

Report Author: 
Jennifer M. Chacón
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 May

This essay looks at how the Trump administration's approach to immigration, while powered by a "rhetoric of unconstrained severity," has "deep roots" in the policies of the previous two administrations and represents a "doubling-down on some of the least productive approaches to enforcement."  The first part of the essay describes the enforcement landscape of the Obama administration and how that landscape changed over time.

Source Organization: 
Other

The Perils of Expedited Removal: How Fast-Track Deportations Jeopardize Asylum Seekers

Report Author: 
Kathryn Shepherd & Royce Bernstein Murray
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 May

This paper documents what is happening to women and children crossing the U.S.-Mexico border and seeking asylum in the U.S. For the most part, they are fleeing horrific violence in Central America. Using information drawn from thousands of cases of families detained at the South Texas Family Residential Center in Dilley, Texas, this report illustrates the difficulties these asylum seekers are having navigating the fast-track removal process known as expedited removal.

Source Organization: 
Other

Crossing the Line: U.S. Border Agents Illegally Reject Asylum Seekers

Report Author: 
B. Shaw Drake, Eleanor Acer, & Olga Byrne
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 May

This report, based on the cases of 125 individuals and families, documents the difficulties asylum seekers are having requesting asylum at the U.S.-Mexican border. In many cases and at multiple ports of entry, asylum seekers are being turned away by Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers without being referred to an asylum officer. Many are told that they must have an "appointment" from Mexican officials before they can seek asylum in the U.S. or that the U.S. is no longer providing asylum.

Source Organization: 
Other

National Interests and Common Ground in the US Immigration Debate: How to Legalize the US Immigration System and Permanently Reduce Its Undocumented Population

Report Author: 
Donald Kerwin & Robert Warren
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Apr

The authors of this paper sketch out a path to reducing the undocumented population in the U.S. through fundamental reform of our immigration system. In their plan, they seem less concerned with "amnesty" programs and more with reforms that will ensure that the undocumented population does not grow again in the future. The paper begins with an analysis of presidential signing statements for immigration-related legislation going back to 1924. "These statements," according to the authors, "reveal broad consensus on the interests and values that the U.S.

Source Organization: 
Other

The Ten Parts of 'Illegal' in 'Illegal Immigration' that I Do Not Understand

Report Author: 
Kari E. Hong
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Apr

The author frames this paper as a response to the question often asked by those in favor of harsher immigration enforcement - "What part of illegal in illegal immigration do you not understand?" While the paper specifies ten distinct problems with the concept of "illegal immigrant," several themes arise. For example, the author refutes the idea that those who are undocumented are willingly in this status.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Other

A Revolving Door No More? A Statistical Profile of Mexican Adults Repatriated from the United States

Report Author: 
Ryan Schultheis and Ariel G. Ruiz Soto
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 May

Return migration to the United States by deportees from Mexico has slowed down significantly in the past decade. The Migration Policy Institute report, A Revolving Door No More? A Statistical Profile of Mexican Adults Repatriated from the United States, gives a statistical and demographic profile of Mexican adults returned by the United States government between 2005 and 2015 using data collected by the Mexican Interior Ministry.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Pre-Migration Trauma Exposure and Mental Health Functioning among Central American Migrants Arriving at the US Border

Report Author: 
Allen Keller, Amy Joscelyne, Megan Granski, Barry Rosenfeld
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jan

In recent years, the influx of families and children from Central America arriving at the US border has been deemed an "urgent humanitarian situation." Examining how the experiences of migrants correspond with the requirements for asylum status can powerfully inform public discourse and policy.  This report focuses on migrants from the Northern Triangle region, formed by El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras, and considers their pre-migration trauma, current mental health functioning, reasons for leaving the region, and rate at which they appeared to satisfy the legal criteria for asylum

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Other
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