National

Dominican Immigrants in the United States

Report Author: 
Jie Zong & Jeanne Batalova
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Apr

This "Spotlight" report details the major demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of Dominican immigrants in the U.S. based on census and Department of Homeland Security data. Among data points covered in the report are: educational attainment, labor force participation, income and poverty levels, immigration pathways and naturalization rates, health coverage, and remittance levels.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Opportunity Lost: The Economic Benefit of retaining Foreign-Born Students in Local Economies

Report Author: 
Giovanni Peri, Gaetano Basso, and Sara McElmurry
Original Date of Publication: 
2016 Apr

This study measures the likelihood that three categories of foreign-born individuals (F-1 visa holders, lawful permanent residents, and undocumented individuals) will be employed five years after graduating from college. Described by the authors as the "first-of-its-kind quantification of college-to-employment rates," the study devotes special attention to the growing numbers of foreign students, i.e. F-1 visa holders -- two-thirds of whom are studying in high-demand STEM fields. As the U.S.

Source Organization: 
Other

The Changing Family Structure of American Children with Unauthorized Parents

Report Author: 
Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes & Esther Arenas-Arroyo
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Nov

During the period from 2009 to 2013, the U.S. carried out 1.8 million deportations, most of them involving fathers and heads of households. This paper examines the impact of these deportations on U.S.-born children, specifically the likelihood that they are now living in single-parent households or with friends or other family members. The authors cite literature showing that the absence of a parent increases school drop-out rates, raises teen pregnancy rates, and limits future earnings.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Other

Beyond DACA - Defying Employer Sanctions Through Civil Disobedience

Report Author: 
Bill Ong Hing
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Dec

Described as a working draft, this paper lays out the case for employers to engage in civil disobedience by continuing to employ Dreamers, i.e. recipients of DACA, if and when their employment authorization expires (either because legal challenges to the revocation of DACA fail and/or Congress fails to find a legislative solution to the problem). The author is Bill Ong Hing, Professor of Law and Migration Studies at the University of San Francisco. Hing notes that hundreds of companies have already gone on record in support of the Dreamer cause.

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Source Organization: 
Other

Dating out is intercultural: Experience and perceived parent disapproval by ethnicity and immigrant generation

Report Author: 
Sharon Shenhav, Belinda Campos and Wendy A. Goldberg
Original Date of Publication: 
2016 Apr

While differences of opinion regarding dating often leads to conflict between parents and children, romantic relationships between individuals from different cultural groups (intercultural relationships) may be particularly fraught. Older generations are typically less approving of intercultural relationships than younger individuals. These intergenerational conflicts may be exacerbated in immigrant families, as intergroup relationships may be viewed as a threat to maintaining cultural traditions and ethnic identity.

Source Organization: 
Other

'I'm a different kind of biracial': How black/white biracial Americans with immigrant parents negotiate race

Report Author: 
Chandra D. L. Waring and Bandana Purkayastha
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jan

Immigrants are racialized upon their migration to the United States based on country of origin, race, and ethnicity. There is an increase of biracial and multiracial people migrating and being born to immigrants in the United States. This study qualitatively analyzed the experiences of biracial Black-White children with at least one immigrant parent. The authors found participants struggled to define race, were aware of the societally produced racial hierarchy, and struggled to maintain peer groups because of their non-binary identity.

Source Organization: 
Other

Loss of face, intergenerational family conflict, and depression among Asian American and European American college students

Report Author: 
Loss of face, intergenerational family conflict, and depression among Asian American and European American college students Zornitsa Kalibatseva, Frederick T.L. Leong, Eun Hye Ham, Brittany K. Lannert, Yang Chen Psychology
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

Intergenerational conflict and loss of face, or the damage to one's social image, status, and reputation, are significantly correlated to the development of depressive symptoms among Asian-American students. Asian cultures often use shame as a sanction for breaking societal expectations that might result in loss of face. The fear of shame may discourage Asian-American immigrants from seeking help for socially unaccepted issues (e.g. mental health).

Source Organization: 
Other

Immigration Data Matters

Report Author: 
Jeanne Batalova, Andriy Shymonyak, and Michelle Mittelstadt
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Mar

This report, which researchers may want to bookmark, contains a long list of easily accessible online data sources providing a broad range of information on the foreign-born and immigration, including demographic characteristics, English proficiency, health and health care access, labor force characteristics, annual immigration admissions, undocumented immigrants, refugees and asylum seekers, temporary humanitarian statuses, immigration enforcement, state-based policies, public opinion about immigration and immigrants, and much more.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Deconstructing the Invisible Wall: How Policy Changes by the Trump Administration Are Slowing and Restricting Legal Immigration

Report Author: 
American Immigrant Lawyers Association
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Mar

This paper takes a look at Trump administration policies and procedures that are slowing the pace of legal immigration and erecting an "invisible wall" even as construction of President Trump's desired physical wall has been delayed or derailed. The authors divide the administration's actions into six broad categories. One policy change involves additional burdens created by new "extreme vetting" policies.

Source Organization: 
Other

Socioeconomic Integration of U.S. Immigrant Groups over the Long Term: The Second Generation and Beyond

Report Author: 
Brian Duncan & Stephen J. Trejo
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Mar

Large-scale immigration raises questions about the social and economic progress of new arrivals, their U.S.-born children and the third generation. Some observers suggest that the sheer size and geographic concentration of recent immigration could hinder immigrants' social and economic integration. The authors of this paper examine some of the available data on this question, as well as methodological problems associated with the data. The Current Population Survey (CPS) has nativity questions about the respondent and her/his parents that may be used to assess generational change.

Source Organization: 
Other
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