National

Racism, the immigration enforcement regime, and the implications for racial inequality in the lives of undocumented young adults

Report Author: 
Aranda, E., & Vaquera, E.
Original Date of Publication: 
2015 Jan

Despite the fact that living without legal documentation in the U.S. is considered a civil offense, undocumented immigrants are often depicted and treated as criminals. As a result, undocumented immigrants are subjected to policing and disciplining, such as detainment and use of ankle monitoring device, that are reserved for people who commit serious criminal offenses. Moreover, during President Barrack Obama's presidency, mass deportation reached an all-time high that only sustained the fears and anxiety of undocumented immigrants.

Source Organization: 
Other

The psychosocial impact of detention and deportation on U.S. migrant children and families

Report Author: 
Brabeck, K.M., Likes, M.B., & Hunter, C.
Original Date of Publication: 
2014 Nov

Mixed status families - a family in which individuals have different immigration statuses but at least one member is unauthorized - are increasingly common in the U.S. Millions of U.S. citizen children have parents at risk of deportation. A parent's detention or deportation can precipitate a family crisis, particularly since detention tends to be abrupt and does not allow time for preparations. Detainees may be transferred to facilities far from their homes, limiting the ability of children to visit their parents.

Source Organization: 
Other

Fear by association: Perceptions of anti-immigrant policy and health outcomes

Report Author: 
Vargas, E.D., Sanchez, G.R., & Juarez, M.
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

In an era of mass deportation and anti-immigrant policies, a "culture of fear" exists among many in immigrant and Latinx communities. Anti-immigrant policies can create hostile sociopolitical environments, and as punitive immigration enforcement becomes increasingly common, those who feel "hunted" by ICE can experience intense feelings of anxiety, fear, and depression. Discrimination experienced by immigrants can also lead to chronic stress, which negatively impacts both physical and mental health.

Source Organization: 
Other

The Economic and Fiscal Consequences of Immigration

Report Author: 
National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Editors: Francine D. Blau, Christopher Mackie
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 May

In an effort to understand the economic and fiscal impacts of immigration on the United States, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine convened a distinguished panel of 22 economists, sociologists, and demographers, chaired by Francine D. Blau, of the Department of Economics at Cornell University. In a study process lasting three years, the panel pored over the existing scholarly literature and secured input from experts around the United States.

Source Organization: 
Other

Comparing trauma exposure, mental health needs, and service utilization across clinical samples of refugee, immigrant, and US-Origin children

Report Author: 
Betancourt, T. S., Newnham, E. A., Birman, D., Lee, R., Ellis, B. H., & Layne, C. M
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

Although the experiences of immigrant children differ from refugee youth, both groups experience stressors associated with acculturation, resettlement, and potential abuse or community violence. Mental health care is underutilized among refugee youth given that most services do not take into account distinct traumatic experiences and histories resulting from war-related violence.

Source Organization: 
Other

Unaccompanied migrant children in the United States: Predictors of placement stability in long term foster care

Report Author: 
Crea, T. M., Lopez, A., Taylor, T., Underwood, D.
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 May

Beginning in 2011, there was an increase of unaccompanied children from the Central American Northern Triangle (El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras,) entering the U.S. While many children were placed with adult sponsors, about 5%-35% remain in long term foster care (LTFC) waiting for deportation hearings. Research has shown that instability in the foster system such as moving frequently has led to poor outcomes.

Source Organization: 
Other

The Education and Work Profiles of the DACA Population

Report Author: 
Randy Capps, Michael Fix, and Jie Zong
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Aug

The authors of this report applied their unique methodology to Census data to determine the characteristics of what they call the DACA “immediately eligible” population—those who have met all educational requirements for participation in the program. Past studies of this population have been survey-based, but have not been fully representative.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Deportations in the Dark: Lack of Process and Information in the Removal of Mexican Migrants

Report Author: 
Sara Campos & Guillermo Cantor
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Sep

This report is based on the testimonies of 600 migrants who were deported from the United States to Mexico between August 2016 and April 2017. Those interviewed pointed towards systematic failures to follow established procedures for detention and deportation. For example, 43.5 percent of interviewees reported that they were not informed of their right to contact their consulate, and more than half (55.7 percent) were not asked if they feared returning home – a key element of applying for asylum.

Source Organization: 
Other

The Impact of a Point-Based Immigration System on Agriculture and Other Business Sectors

Report Author: 
Stuart Anderson
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Aug

This paper examines a congressional proposal known as the RAISE Act to substitute an immigration point system for the current system of numerical limits within preference categories. The author notes that the Canadian and Australian immigration point systems—often cited as models—are not analogous to the system proposed by the RAISE Act.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
American Federation of Teachers

Sikhs in America: A History of Hate

Report Author: 
A.C. Thompson
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Aug

As monotheistic followers of a 15th century religion from South Asia, Sikh men refrain from shaving and wear turbans. In America, they are often victims of violence or abuse by those who confuse them for Muslims. Although there are an estimated 500,000 Sikhs currently living in the United States, they have long been the victims of xenophobia and anti-immigrant sentiment.

Source Organization: 
Other
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