Research

Addressing health disparities in the mental health of refugee children and adolescents through community-based participatory research: A study in 2 communities

Report Author: 
Bentancourt, T.S., Frounfelker, R., Mishra, T., Hussein, A., & Falzarano, R.
Original Date of Publication: 
2015 Jul

Refugee youth have a much higher risk of experiencing psychological distress and mental health disorders than their non-refugee U.S. peers. Much of this elevated risk is due to "multiple acute and chronic stressors" that youth face throughout their refugee experience. To explore the mental health needs and community strengths of Somali Bantu and Bhutanese refugee youth in Massachusetts, this study utilized a community-based participatory research approach - a method that ensures the communities being studied are meaningfully involved at all research stages.

Source Organization: 
Other

The Education and Work Profiles of the DACA Population

Report Author: 
Randy Capps, Michael Fix, and Jie Zong
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Aug

The authors of this report applied their unique methodology to Census data to determine the characteristics of what they call the DACA “immediately eligible” population—those who have met all educational requirements for participation in the program. Past studies of this population have been survey-based, but have not been fully representative.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Deportations in the Dark: Lack of Process and Information in the Removal of Mexican Migrants

Report Author: 
Sara Campos & Guillermo Cantor
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Sep

This report is based on the testimonies of 600 migrants who were deported from the United States to Mexico between August 2016 and April 2017. Those interviewed pointed towards systematic failures to follow established procedures for detention and deportation. For example, 43.5 percent of interviewees reported that they were not informed of their right to contact their consulate, and more than half (55.7 percent) were not asked if they feared returning home – a key element of applying for asylum.

Source Organization: 
Other

The Impact of a Point-Based Immigration System on Agriculture and Other Business Sectors

Report Author: 
Stuart Anderson
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Aug

This paper examines a congressional proposal known as the RAISE Act to substitute an immigration point system for the current system of numerical limits within preference categories. The author notes that the Canadian and Australian immigration point systems—often cited as models—are not analogous to the system proposed by the RAISE Act.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
American Federation of Teachers

Sikhs in America: A History of Hate

Report Author: 
A.C. Thompson
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Aug

As monotheistic followers of a 15th century religion from South Asia, Sikh men refrain from shaving and wear turbans. In America, they are often victims of violence or abuse by those who confuse them for Muslims. Although there are an estimated 500,000 Sikhs currently living in the United States, they have long been the victims of xenophobia and anti-immigrant sentiment.

Source Organization: 
Other

The Philippines: Beyond Labor Migration, Toward Development and (Possibly) Return

Report Author: 
Maruja M.B. Asis
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jul

The Philippines has a significant culture of migration and is a major labor exporter worldwide. Ten million Filipinos, around 10 percent of the population, are working abroad, primarily in the Middle East and Asia. Thanks to an improved economy in recent years, the Philippines is now developing policies for returning overseas Filipino workers (OFWs). This study examines the evolving labor policies of the last few decades and shows how the country is incorporating migration into its long-term development planning.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

The Immigrant Right to Work

Report Author: 
Geoffrey Heeren
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Sep

The author reviews over 100 years of political and legal history to make the case that unauthorized residents of the United States have a right work.  A key starting point is that there is currently no statute that actually prevents unauthorized immigrants from working (if they do not present false papers). Rather, through employer sanctions and related policies there is a putative illegality that forces undocumented workers into conditions that limit their choice of employment and reduces their labor rights, mainly through fears of deportation.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Other

Gender-Based Violence against Women: Both Cause for Migration and Risk along the Journey

Report Author: 
Anja Parish
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Sep

This brief addresses gender-based violence that may cause women to migrate, as well as the prevalence of such violence along the journey and the vulnerable position female migrants are in when arriving in a country of first asylum.  The author notes that increasingly rape and sexual violence have become military strategies, often used within a single country when there are multiple factions fighting for control.  Evidence is presented from all over the world

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Immigration and the Bully Pulpit

Report Author: 
Jennifer M. Chacón
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 May

This essay looks at how the Trump administration's approach to immigration, while powered by a "rhetoric of unconstrained severity," has "deep roots" in the policies of the previous two administrations and represents a "doubling-down on some of the least productive approaches to enforcement."  The first part of the essay describes the enforcement landscape of the Obama administration and how that landscape changed over time.

Source Organization: 
Other

The Perils of Expedited Removal: How Fast-Track Deportations Jeopardize Asylum Seekers

Report Author: 
Kathryn Shepherd & Royce Bernstein Murray
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 May

This paper documents what is happening to women and children crossing the U.S.-Mexico border and seeking asylum in the U.S. For the most part, they are fleeing horrific violence in Central America. Using information drawn from thousands of cases of families detained at the South Texas Family Residential Center in Dilley, Texas, this report illustrates the difficulties these asylum seekers are having navigating the fast-track removal process known as expedited removal.

Source Organization: 
Other