Human Services

Immigration and the Welfare State: Immigrant and Native Use Rates and Benefit Levels for Means-Tested Welfare and Entitlement Programs

Report Author: 
Alex Nowrasteh & Robert Orr
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 May

Overall, immigrants are less likely to consume welfare benefits and, when they do, they generally consume a lower dollar value of benefits than native-born Americans. This appears contrary to the study conducted by the CIS (Publication 3), but Cato claims its work is more accurate because it examines individuals with immigration status, while CIS measures welfare use by households headed by immigrants (which often contain multiple native-born Americans).

Source Organization: 
Cato Institute

Philanthropic Strategies to Support Refugees and Asylum Seekers

Report Author: 
Suzette Brooks Masters
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jun

Philanthropic Strategies to Support Refugees and Asylum Seekers profiles 10 donors' diverse approaches and strategies to supporting refugees and asylum seekers, and offers key lessons gleaned from their experience. These profiles are designed to provide a roadmap for supporting refugees, asylum seekers, and unaccompanied children seeking protection in the United States and abroad.

Source Organization: 
Other

Immigrant Lives, American Futures: Linking Asset Building and Immigrant Integration

Report Author: 
Manuel Pastor, Rhonda Ortiz, & Magaly N. López
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 May

Immigrant Lives, American Futures: Linking Asset Building and Immigrant Integration seeks to create common cause and greater alignment among funders interested in immigrant integration and those interested in asset-building. Often, the horizon for action is different for both, i.e. more short-term and crisis oriented for integration funders, and more long-term and life cycle focused among asset-building funders. To bridge this difference will require a change in perspective on the part of both types of funders.

Source Organization: 
Other

Chilling Effects: The Expected Public Charge Rule and Its Impact on Legal Immigrant Families’ Public Benefits Use

Report Author: 
Jeanne Batalova, Michael Fix, & Mark Greenberg
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jun

The Trump Administration is currently writing a regulation that will completely change the way the government determines whether an immigrant (or an immigrant's sponsor) is "likely to become a public charge" by greatly expanding the list of public benefits, the use of which will make immigrants inadmissible (and possibly deportable).

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Leveraging Social Science Expertise in Immigration Policymaking

Report Author: 
Ming Hsu Chen
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Apr

Why is social science expertise important in policymaking, and why is such expertise noticeably shunned in immigration policymaking, an area of governance often swirling in a sea of misinformation, prejudice, and political posturing? These are two questions that the author of this paper seeks to answer.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Other

A Way Forward for Refugees: Findings from the WES Pilot Project

Report Author: 
Denise Jillions
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Apr

In 2017, 66 million people became refugees and asylum seekers after being displaced from their homes. World Education Services (WES), an international credential evaluation company, launched a program in 2016 called the Refugee Pilot Project, in order to test an alternative approach to verifying the academic credentials of Syrian refugees in Canada. WES started this program because refugees often have missing or incomplete documentation and their circumstances prevent them from obtaining verified documents to comply with WES's standard procedure.

Source Organization: 
Other

Immigration Enforcement under Trump: A Loose Cannon

Report Author: 
Shoba Siviprasad Wadhia
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Feb

Despite multiple stays of removal after an order for removal from the United States in 2006, Ravi Ragbir, an immigrant activist, was taken into custody during a routine meeting with Immigration and Customs Enforcement in January 2018.  His case is symptomatic of a larger problem caused by Trump administration immigration policies. This report addresses the Trump administration's change in longstanding policies governing the exercise of prosecutorial discretion in relation to people who have received an order of removal.

Source Organization: 
Other

Detained and Denied: Healthcare Access in Immigration Detention

Report Author: 
Sola Stamm, Reena Arora, Laura Redman, and Evelin Gomez
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Feb

As the Trump administration threatens to deport an increasing number of immigrants, immigration advocates have expressed concern over the state of health care treatment within detention centers. The New York Lawyers for Public Interest (NYLPI) provides legal representation and advocacy work for undocumented immigrants in ICE custody.

Source Organization: 
Other

Parental perspectives on parent-child conflict and acculturation in Iranian immigrants in California

Report Author: 
Elmira Jannati and Stuart Allen
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Feb

Acculturation--defined as "moving toward a (new) culture"--is a process that can impact many aspects of life for immigrants and their families. Older and younger immigrant generations may not engage to the same extent with the host culture in their new country. These acculturation gaps are often evident when examining relationships between immigrant parents and their children.

Source Organization: 
Other

Loss of face, intergenerational family conflict, and depression among Asian American and European American college students

Report Author: 
Loss of face, intergenerational family conflict, and depression among Asian American and European American college students Zornitsa Kalibatseva, Frederick T.L. Leong, Eun Hye Ham, Brittany K. Lannert, Yang Chen Psychology
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

Intergenerational conflict and loss of face, or the damage to one's social image, status, and reputation, are significantly correlated to the development of depressive symptoms among Asian-American students. Asian cultures often use shame as a sanction for breaking societal expectations that might result in loss of face. The fear of shame may discourage Asian-American immigrants from seeking help for socially unaccepted issues (e.g. mental health).

Source Organization: 
Other
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